Death Of A Gentleman: Where Did Cricket Go Wrong

Starring: N Srinivasan, Lalit Modi, Chris Gayle, Kevin Pietersen, David Warner, Haroon Lorgat, Ravi Shastri, Rahul Dravid, Harsha Bhogle, Sam Collins, Jarrod Kimber

Directors: Jarrod Kimber, Johnny Blank, Sam Collins

Written by: Sam Collins, Jon Hotten, Jarrod Kimber

Death of a Gentleman

The Cinema Station has given its reviews over the top Hollywood and Bollywood releases that have hit the screens in the last 10 months. Today, we give our views on a film that will give you an insight on the transition of the game of cricket, the formats in which the game is played and the authorities that control the game.

Prologue

Since the inception of mammoth T20 leagues like IPL, The Big Bash, etc. we have seen the white ball score over the red. The graph below shows trends in T20, One Day Internationals and Test matches from 2011 to 2015 and the numbers speak for themselves.

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Since, the inception of ICC in 1909, ICC boasts of a 106 members (10 complete, 38 Associate, 57 Affiliate) from which 10 are eligible to play all the formats of the game, out of 38 Associate, 6 have ODI and 8 have T20 status, while the remaining are unknown to the fame and exposure of the Gentleman’s game.

The Review

With an ambition to figure out what went wrong with Test Cricket, our directors, Sam Collins, Jon Hotten and Jarrod Kimber set out on a mission to understand the decline in the Test Cricket Format. Their expeditions range from Australia to England, followed by India and Dubai. In order to understand why Test cricket lost its shine, they go on to discover much more, which may go on to change your perception of the game.

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Centralizing their demand for Test Cricket around the life of Australian batsman Edward Cowan, the directors seem to strike the right chord from the very beginning and make sure you are tuned right in. Ranging from the emotions of a batsman who gets a chance to represent his country as a Test cricketer to those of a fan who sees the most beautiful format of the game perish before him, the 100 minute movie covers through a wide range of emotions, which will be felt by every cricket fan across the globe.

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As the directorial trio percolate into deeper trenches of the ICC and the national governing bodies, they find themselves amidst the biggest scandal the game has ever seen. With detailed interviews of tycoons like N.Srinivasan, Lalit Modi, Tim May, Haroon Lorgat, Tony Greig, Giles Clarke, David Becker and many more personalities of the game, the film gets gripping and interesting with each minute. With a few months into their journey, the makers realize that their movie was not anymore about the death of Test cricket, but it was the Death of the Gentleman’s game.

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As this journey progresses, the makers uncover the truth behind various factors that actually run the game, which all tie down to money and power abuse. However distressing and shocking are the revelations the movie makes, the amount of effort and the story of Edward Cowan which runs parallel with the movie are one of the most touching points. However, at some points, we feel the novice experience of the makers as they lack to provide substantial proof for their claims, and statistics is something what a cricket fan loves. The camera angles, patched up interviews and ill stocked logistics are some of the minor, yet observant flaws of the movie.

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The Death Of A Gentleman may fall short of being a masterpiece, but it is the first of its kind since which talks explicitly about the corruption in cricket. Launched on a platform like TVF, gives us a hint of the revolution the Indian television industry is on the verge of. It is a movie, undoubtedly worth your time and money and if you love to see the red Kookaburra swing on a sunny Perth morning, its not only the icing, but the extra chocolate to the cake.

My Rating: 4.0/5

 

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